March 14, 2017
Stuart Kime

No robust evidence to prove learning styles exist

Video Duration: Approx 4mins

presented by Stuart Kime

This week leading academics from the worlds of neuroscience, education and psychology expressed their concerns over the continuing popularity of the theory of ‘learning styles’, saying the approach is ineffective, a waste of resources and ...

March 10, 2017
Boy with book

How much difference does going to school make?

Reading Time: Approx 3mins

By Professor Christine Merrell, CEM Director of Research Development.

The contribution of schooling to learning gains of pupils in year 1 to 6

Using longitudinal data from our PIPS and InCAS assessments, we have been able to explore this question...

February 16, 2017
Carol

Carol Taylor Fitz-Gibbon, 1938 – 2017

Reading Time: Approx 3mins

By Professor Rob Coe, Director, CEM

At the end of January, the educational researcher who influenced me more than any other, my formative mentor, an inspirational leader, and the most innovative educational thinker I have known, died...

February 15, 2017
Rob Coe

A Vision for Enhanced Professionalism

Video Duration: Approx 24mins

presented by Professor Rob Coe

"Teaching is far and away the most important of all professions. Teachers make more difference to more people's lives, in a way that more people feel passionate about... what they do really matters." - Professor Robert Coe, Director, CEM.

The new professional body for the teaching profession, The Chartered College of Teaching hosted their inaugural conference in London on Thursday 16th February...

February 3, 2017
Girl On Computer

The future of primary assessment: Learning first or accountability?

Reading Time: Approx 3mins

Christine Merrell, Head Teachers' Roundtable Summit, 2nd Feb 2017

I was asked to speak about the future of primary assessment in relation to learning and accountability at the Head Teachers’ Roundtable Summit in London on 2nd Feb. The summit offered an opportunity to debate matters that enable schools to thrive and flourish, and was clearly an important forum, attracting over 200 delegates...

January 24, 2017
Maths

Investigating Mathematical Attainment and Progress (IMAP)

Reading Time: Approx 3mins

by Dr Lee Copping

Low attainment is acknowledged to be one of the most serious problems in mathematics education.

The proportion of the very lowest attaining students at the end of Key Stage 3 has roughly doubled since the 1970s. This group now constitutes about 15% of the Year 9 cohort and these students have difficulty answering even basic questions about core ideas...

December 6, 2016
Kids at computer

Education systems can only be accountable for what they can influence

Reading Time: Approx 2mins

Professor Peter Tymms, Director of iPIPS, CEM and School of Education, Durham University

This week’s PISA results show that England’s performance has hardly changed since the last round of assessments in 2012. Indeed, England’s results and the results of most other countries have remained pretty stable since PISA was introduced by the OECD in 2000...

November 16, 2016
Rob Coe

Reasons to be optimistic about assessment

Reading Time: Approx 4mins

by Stephen Tierney

This blog post is taken from the first part of a presentation Stephen Tierney (@leadinglearner) gave at the Learning First Conference in Sheffield on the 5th November 2016, with an introduction by Rob Coe.

"I already knew about Stephen from his blogs and twitter posts, so I had high expectations before I first heard him speak. I was not disappointed. He was able to make something...

November 1, 2016
Music Child

Making a positive primary to secondary transition in Music

Reading Time: Approx 3mins

By Dimitra Kokotsaki

Moving from Key Stage 2 to Key Stage 3 can be a big upheaval for many pupils. Schools work hard to ease the transition with a range of policies, plans, mechanisms and strategies. But do they always work...

October 4, 2016
Teacher Student

NEON 2016

Reading Time: Approx 3mins

Enabling wider access to Higher Education by Laura da Costa

In June of this year, a team of CEM researchers, at Durham University, travelled to Leicester for the NEON Summer Symposium. The National Education Opportunities Network (NEON) was founded in 2012 as a professional organisation supporting those involved in widening participation (WP) to higher education (HE)...

April 29, 2016
Science Students

The big questions we should all be asking about practical science

Reading Time: Approx 4mins

By Dr Helen Cramman

Science is not short of big questions to ask: How did the universe begin? How did life on earth begin? What makes us human? I could go on. But even though there are plenty of big questions in science, we must not forget to ask the smaller, no less important questions to ensure that we are nurturing the future generations who will go on to ask and answer the big questions of their time...

April 26, 2016
Confused Boy

Helping teachers give every child the support they need

Reading Time: Approx 3mins

By Dr Christine Merrell

It can be hard for even the best teachers to notice differences in the behaviour of one child in a busy primary classroom, even though responding to these signs can be the key to helping a child make good progress.

However, I hope that new research by the Centre for Evaluation and Monitoring (CEM) at Durham University will be able to offer both new insights and practical help...

March 4, 2014

Would you let this test into your classroom?

Reading Time: Approx 6mins

By Professor Robert Coe, 27 February 2014

In England, the government has announced the end of using levels for assessment. If that means an end to meaningless numbers based on unstandardized, impressionistic, selective and biased judgements that fail to capture true learning, it is a good thing. But will it? And what have we got that is better?

As schools start to confront the reality of having to design their own assessment systems, or adopt them from elsewhere, two things have become clear to me. The first is that in assessment, quality matters. The difference between good and bad assessment is huge and it makes an important difference. The second is that the understanding of what makes...

January 9, 2014

Classroom observation: it’s harder than you think

Reading Time: Approx 7mins

by Professor Robert Coe

We’ve all done it: observed another teacher’s lesson and made a judgement about how effective the teaching was. Instinctively it feels valid. I am a good teacher; I’ll know a good lesson when I see one. We’ve all experienced it from the other side – being observed – but this time the feeling may be more mixed. Sometimes you get real insight from someone who sees what you don’t, questions what you take for granted and makes you think differently. Sometimes they just tell you what they would have done, or focus on some trivial irrelevance...

October 10, 2013

Baseline assessment, to test, or not to test, that is the question…

Reading Time: Approx 2mins

To test, or not to test? That is the question which provokes one of the most keenly fought debates in education policy, and which can lead to soul searching on an almost Shakespearean scale among teachers and academics.

From a CEM perspective there is a strong argument for testing as a baseline assessment and the Centre has recently submitted evidence to the DfE making the case for this as part of the consultation on Primary Assessment and Accountability held by the Department (#cemevidenceforassessment)...